ZIF Video Of The Week: SENA DAGADU: Extra Large feat. M3NSA

My goodness, what a Fokn great video. By now you’ve heard us speak about the illustrious Fokn Bois a few times, whether it be their immigration concerns or their knack for ostracizing Nigerians, their ability to entertain would make General Maximus Decimus Meridius green with envy. I hardly ever come across any project they’re associated with and leave without being thoroughly impressed. As for this video, it features M3NSA and I believe it was directed by Wanlov (so it’s Fokn Boi’d out!), as for Sena Dagadu, my knowledge is limited, she seems to live in Hungary but clearly is Ghanaian. What I love about this video is something that I attribute to much of their material, it simply shines, it engages you and drops you off in happy land. The final shot of the set in Accra is a lovely reminder that in 2013, artists don’t need to be in a major media center to create broadcast quality art.

Overall Grade: A –

Azontomentary [ZIF Press]

Dance crazes are a dime a dozen, but never have I come across one with the sociological implications of the Ghanaian dance referred to as “Azonto”. Here’s a quick synopsis by Wiki:

The African dance form incorporates complex co-ordinates body movement and non-verbal communication in a rhythmic fashion in very few one-two timed steps. Just like most African dances, knee bending and hip movements are rudiments to dancing it. The dance has effectively evolved from a few rudimentary moves to embrace depictions of ironing,washing, driving, boxing, grooming, praying, swimming, and others.

Generally, the dance reflects the creativity and rich sense of humour of the Ghanaian people. The dance, which is usually performed with an accompanying smile, evolved from the combination of several local dance moves that originated from the southern-most part of Ghana during the early 2000s. The dance has evolved with the fast pace dance culture of modern West Africa. It is also true that before the dance became famous, youth in senior high schools of Ghana (especially Tema) had a similar but different way of doing the dance. A modification of that is what we see today. It involved a similar movement of the feet, hands, and hips and, at the end of every move, a gun shot was mimicked with the hand and, if possible, the mouth.

We are proudly working with our partners at Aspecks to showcase this documentary which takes an in depth on the ground look at a dance that is changing the way nations, culture and their peoples identify themselves. Press can apply for an advance media pass that includes a first hand glimpse of the film, send inquires to ladyt@zebraisfood.com.

Stay tuned to updates about the film and more things Azonto at Azontomentary.tumblr.com