FOKN Bois be Sexin Islamic Girls

 

My homie Nana-Kofi over at our affiliate ASPECKS told me about M3nsa a long time ago, they hooked up some t-shirts for his last solo album. M3nsa’s collobarative effort with Wanlov the Kubolor (love these monikers) has been aptly titled the Fokn Bois’. For those of you familiar with Pidgin, the lyrics will hit home, for those of you who struggle with your acoustic diversity, peep these lyrics off the track:

WOKE UP EARLY IN THE A.M
MEGAPHONE CHANTING
WOT R DEY SAYIN?
IS HE PRAYIN OR PLAYIN?
ME DIER AM GOIN NOT STAYIN
HABIBA IS DAT HOW U R?
WEN WE BENT OVER DID U C OUR SHUA?
SAW YOR BOTTOS IN THE AIR
COULDN’T HELP IT
SO WE STARED

Yes, they are in the shock the shit out of you (if you are Nigerian or Muslim especially) business. That’s why I’m lining up what has to be my most anticpated interview yet for ZIF, I may have to have my translator stand by, but I will assuredly explore these guys more, as you should as well. You can start by YouTubing the world’s “1st Pidgin Musical”, titled, Coz Ov Moni and the respective soundtrack. Peep their interview with ASPECKS about that project and a clip from the “musical” after the jump. It’s Fokn great!

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M.anifest, Suffer, Remix

It’s been a good week on the Serengeti, plenty of herd animals grazing, I’ve been lucky enough to bag a few in my weekly hunt. Today’s catch comes from ZIF staple, M.anifest, actually it’s a remix of a track called “Suffer” which we showcased in April.

M.anifest – Suffer (M3NSA Remix)

Ghana is currently blowing up music wise, although that’s somewhat on the low (so don’t go Google search “Ghana music” and expect to understand). Specifically the rise of M.anifest(Minneapolis), M3nsaRocky Dawuni (Los Angeles), and home stay talent like Macho Rapper have all been featured recently on ZIF. Something about West Africa…roots?

West Africa Doesn’t Need 50 Cent. They Already Have Macho Rapper.

For those of you unaware, African rap has come to the party, someone go tell Elvis so he can steal this shit. I’m working with my homie Nana-Kofi over at ASPECKS on some business, and I brought up the question, what do they listen to in Africa?  Now, Nana-Kofi is from Ghana (in England now) and therefore, could only speak definitively on his native land. To be frank, I asked the question and followed quickly with a suggestion, “they must listen to Fitty?”. Nope, not really. He said that they listen to local stuff, I must have sounded quite incredulous,  because he quickly told me that he would send me some links and in one of them was this video by Macho Rapper. The song is rapped in a combination of Pidgin English and Twi (the language spoken by Ashanti people, frequently spoken in Ghana). What I like about this sound/video is the sheer gulliness of it all, it’s screams ‘genuine’ and the language and cultural novelty of it all remind me a lot of Die Antwoord‘s appeal. Another thing that Macho has going for him is his own vernacular, one that he calls ‘Da Boorisis’, as he puts it:

Basically, am always talking about myself because am bringing new style in the game, it’s all about boorisis. Boorisis simple means the fusion of my image   and my music, am actually selling my image and the music, some might like my image not the music and some might my music and not my image

When he’s not rapping he spends time working on his physique, he runs his own gym and moonlights as a bouncer. When you’re built like that and spit flames in Pidgin, who needs Fitty? The movement there is called ‘hip life’, eerily synonymous to the whole Zef life thing. I’m very intrigued with this genre, one that I’m trying to wrap my head around it more to share with you people’s, but not too much, shit, who remembers the guy who first wrote about Die Antwoord, yeah, exactly.

P.S. Twitter search “Macho Rapper”, you get some hilarious posts.

Note from M.anifest: Ghana or bust

In a few weeks I’ll be headed back home to Ghana for a month to create music with my 89 year old ethnomusicologist grandfather, Prof J.H. Nketia. I’ve made many thrilling discoveries about him and striking similarities of his work with what I do Hip-Hop wise, including some poetry he wrote in the 40’s which when he recites sounds like rap! I kid you not. In the last few years a filmmaker, Justin Schell, has been documenting my musical progress and this connection between my grandpa and me as part of a bigger documentary featuring myself, Maria Isa and Tou Saik Lee.

Check out the dope remix of Golly Gosh by Ghanaian producer DJ Juls, I call it the Blackstar remix.

Golly Gosh (Dj Juls Remix)